4 Essential English Questions To Ask A Stranger

Teacher: Robin    Runtime: 6:51     Series: Beginner 2      icon-heart Donate     

This greetings video will teach 4 very important questions you should ask someone when you meet them for the first time.  Make sure you know and use these 4 common questions.
이 인사관련 동영상은 여러분이 누군가를 처음으로 만날 때 그 사람에게 물어야 할 4가지 아주 중요한 질문에 대하여 가르쳐 줍니다. 이 4가지 일반적인 질문을 확실히 알고 사용할 수 있도록 하세요.
[Part 1]

Hello, in this video we are going to talk about four essential questions you should know when you first meet someone. Ok…

Now, I call them essential questions, cause essential means very important…you must know. Ok…

Now, probably you already kno wmost of them, but let’s just review them anyways.

Let’s take a look at the first one.

You think it’s very easy, but maybe you’re using it wrong.

The first question, “What is your name?”.

“What is your name?”

Now, probably when you were young, your English teacher taught you,
“What is your name?”.

…And that’s fine, but you’re not a child anymore, you’re an adult. Ok…

You’ve grown up.

So you shouldn’t say, “What is your name?” anymore. Ok…

This sounds childish.

“What is your name?” Ok…

An adult….we are going to use a contraction.

“What’s”, ok…”What is…”, we’re going to change it to “What’s”.

“What’s your name?” Alright…

This is more common.

“What’s your name?”

It’s faster.

“What’s your name?”

“What’s your name?”

Ok, I wrote my name here.

“My name is Robin.”

Again, this is a little bit childish.

“What’s your name?”

“My name is Robin.”

“My name is….”, again… you don’t want to use this style anymore.

Let’s make a contraction.

Make it faster.

“What’s your name?”

“My name’s Robin.”

“My name’s…….my name’s Robin.”

“What’s your name?”

“My name’s Robin.”

Alright…this is adult style.

Also, for “What’s your name?”, you could just say, “I’m Robin.”

This is ok, too.

So, “My name’s Robin. I’m Robin.”…doesn’t matter.

Both are ok.

Let’s move on to the next question.

2:05 [Part 2]

Ok, the next question.

Very common.

Very easy.

“Where are you from?”

“Where are you from?”

Ok…so say it very fast.

“Where are you from?”

“Where are you from?”

“Where are you from?”

“I from Korea.”

Oh, this is terrible.

So many of my students say, “I from Korea.”

Don’t! Don’t say “I from Korea.”

Let’s put a line through that.

Bad grammar.

“I from Korea.”…no the correct is, “I’m…..I’m from Korea.”

I have to hear this ‘m’ sound.

“I’m from Korea.” Alright…

“Where are you from?”

“Where are you from?”

“I’m from Korea.”

Well, I’m not from Korea.

“I’m from Canada.”

Ok, so make sure you can say this question very fast.

“Where are you from?”

And make sure you use, ‘I’m’

“I’m from Korea.”

Let’s go to the next question.

3:05 [Part 3]

“Where do you live?”

That’s our next question.

“Where do you live?”

Don’t say, “Where are you live?”

Ok, that is wrong.

The question is, “Where… do… you… live?”

“Where do you live?”

“Where do you live?”

“Where do you live?”

Ok, so, “Where do you live?”, ‘live’ is asking where’s your house…your home.

“Where do you live?”

So your answer should have your city or area.

So, “Where do you live?”

First answer here.

“I live Seoul.”

“I live Seoul.”

This is wrong!

Ok, bad grammar.

“Where do you live?”

“I live Seoul.”, No!

“Where do you live?”

“I live in…in Seoul.”

You need the preposition ‘in’.

Always. You always need ‘in’ Seoul.

“Where do you live?”

“I live in Seoul.” Ok…

Uhhh, the last one here…is a short way.

“Where do you live?”

Ok, you don’t have to say, “I live…”.

You could just start with, “in”.

The preposition ‘in’.

So, “Where do you live?”

“In Seoul.” Ok…

So, again.

“Where do you live?”

“I live in Seoul.”

“In Seoul.”

Never say this.

Alright…

Let’s move on to the last question.

4:28 [Part 4]

“What do you do?”

“What do you do?”

Ok, this is asking about ‘job’.

“What do you do everyday for work?”

Ok, “What do you do?”

Now English speakers don’t say, “What…do …you …do?”

We say it very fast, we say, “What do you do?”

“What do you do?”

“What do you do?”

Ok, very difficult to hear.

“Whatdayou…this is whatdayou. Whatdayou do?”

“Whatdayou do?”

Ok…

So, I ask to my students, “What do you do?”

And a lot of my students say, “I’m student.”

“I’m student.”

This is wrong!

Ok, this is bad grammar!

Don’t use, “I’m student.”

“I’m student.”

“What do you do?”

“I’m student.”

Don’t use that. That’s terrible grammar.

You should use this…and take a look.

“I’m ‘a'”. Ok…

Don’t forget this…’a’

“I’m a…”

It sounds like one word.

“I’m a…”

“I’m a…”

“What do you do?”

“I’m a student.”

“I’m a student.”

“I’m a student.”

Ok…

“What do you do?”

“I’m a student.”

The next one.

“an…”

Remember, these words start with vowels.

Vowels, a, e, i, o , u.

And words that start with vowels, we should use ‘an’. Ok…

“So, what do you do?”

“I’m an engineer.”

“I’m an office worker.” Ok…

Alright, so that’s the last question.

“What do you do?”

So let’s review the questions.

The first question.

“What’s your name?”

“My name is Robin.”

Second question.

“Where are you from?”

“I’m from Canada.”

Third question.

“Where do you live?”

“I live in Anyang.”

And the last question.

“What do you do?”

“I’m a teacher.”

Alright…

So, I hope you understand how to say the questions…also how to answer the questions.

These are very important questions.

You should know them.

That’s it.

See you next video.

[End]

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