How to Express Weight in English

Teacher: Robin    Runtime: 8:23     Series: Beginner 2      icon-heart Donate     

This numbers video will teach you how to express weight in English. The video will teach both the American ‘Imperial System’ and the International ‘Metric System’.
이 숫자관련 동영상은 무게를 영어로 어떻게 표현하는지 가르쳐 줍니다. 이 동영상은 미국 임페리얼 시스템과 국제 매트릭 시스템 두 가지 다 가르쳐 줍니다.
[Part 1]

Hello, everyone.

In this video, we’re going to talk about a very sensitive topic; weight…or how much you weigh.

Alright…

Again, there’s two systems.

There’s the Metric System using kilograms.

And there’s the Imperial System that they will use in the U.S.A. using pounds.

But first, let’s look at the Metic System…using kilograms.

Ok…

So, there’s two questions again.

The most common questions to ask someone about their weight.

So let’s look at the first question.

The first question, “How much do you weigh?”

“How much do you weigh?”

Now, notice I don’t put “weight”.

Ok…

‘Weigh’ is a verb and ‘weight’ is a noun.

This questions, we have to use ‘weigh’.

“How much do you weigh?”

And your answer.

“I weigh seventy-five kilograms.”

Ok, that’s my weight.

“I weigh seventy-five kilograms.”

Now listen.

I say “Seventy-five kilograms.”

“Kilograms.”

Don’t forget the ‘s’ at the end.

“Kilograms.”

“I weigh seventy-five kilograms.”

Let’s look at this answer.

“I weight seventy-five kilograms.”

Ok, you see this ‘x’?

That means it’s wrong.

Ok, never say, “I weight…”

This is wrong.

It’s “I weigh…”

“I weigh…”

“I weight seventy-five kilograms.”

Ok, so this is wrong.

Do not say this.

Let’s move on to the next question.

“What’s your weight?”

Ok, now it’s using the noun form.

“What’s your weight?”

“My weight is seventy-five kilograms.”

Ok…

Again, “My weigh…My weigh…is seventy-five kilograms.”

‘X’ again.

Don’t use that.

“What’s your weight?”

“My weight is seventy-five kilograms.”

Don’t use this.

Ok, it’s a little bit confusing.

Especially the ‘weigh’ and the ‘weight’.

Takes a lot of practice.

Ok, I’m going to say these again, really fast.

So, listen carefully.

“How much do you weigh?”

“I weigh seventy-five kilograms.”

“How much do you weigh?”

“I weigh seventy-five kilograms.”

“What’s your weight?”

“My weight is seventy-five kilograms.”

“What’s your weight?”

“My weight is seventy-five kilograms.”

Ok, let’s look at a few example sentences.

2:55 [Part 2 – Example Sentences #1]

Alright, the first example sentence…

“I gained fifteen kilograms over the summer.”
“I gained fifteen kilograms over the summer.”

The next one.

“I’m fat. I weigh one hundred kilograms.”
“I’m fat. I weigh one hundred kilograms.”

And the last one.

“I need to lose forty kilograms.”
“I need to lose forty kilograms.”

3:35 [Part 3]

Ok, let’s talk about the Imperial System, now.

So, remember, the Metric System uses kilograms and grams.

The Imperial System…it’s going to use ounces and pounds.

Ok…

So, let’s take a look.

Here’s my question, again.

“How much do you weigh?”

And before, I… I said, “I weigh seventy-five kilograms.”

Well, in the Imperial System, “I weight one hundred and sixty-five pound.”

This means ‘pounds’.

Ok, so let’s take a look at the two systems.

So, again, we use..in the Metric, ‘grams’, they’re going to use ‘ounce’.

So one ounce is about…about twenty-eight grams.

Ok…

And one pound is about point four five kilograms.

Ok…

So, these are not exact numbers, it’s just ‘around’.

Ok…

Now, how to write one pound…

This is “one pound”.

Ok…

This is not a ‘one’.

This is actually an ‘l’.

‘l-b’

‘l-b’

One ‘l-b’.

That means “one pound”.

Now ‘pound’ starts with ‘p’.

So, why do they write ‘l-b’?

Well ‘l-b’ is actually from old latin.

It comes from a latin term; libra pondo.

But, don’t worry about the latin term.

That’s very old, but still, these days, we use ‘l-b’.

That just means ‘pound’.

So, “one pound.”

Ok, this is single, ‘one’.

Now we got two.

“Pounds.”

We usually write the ‘s’.

‘l-b-s’.

“One pound.”

“Two pounds.”

For the ‘ounces’.

‘One’ ‘oh’ ‘zee’.

Ok, ‘one’ ‘oh’ ‘zee’.

“One ounce.”

“One ounce.”

“Two ounce.”

It’s always ‘oh’ ‘zee’

Sometimes you’re going to see ‘one’ ‘f-l-o-z’.

Now, the ‘f-l’ means ‘fluid’.

Fluid is like a liquid.

Like water.

“Fluid…ounce”

And you’re always going to see this on stuff like perfume or cologne.

Ahhh…if you check your perfume or cologne at home, I’m sure you’re going to see this.

Ahhh…you’re not going to see the ‘one’.

It’s going to be a bigger number, but you’re going to see the ‘f-l-o-z’.

Alright, so that’s the Imperial System.

It’s an older system.

It’s a little more complicated and confusing.

Alright…

But my weight in the Imperial System is “a hundred and sixty-five pound.”

Let’s take a look at a few more examples of how to express weight in the Imperial System.

6:59 [Part 5 – Example Sentences #2]

Alright, the first example…

“A baby weighs nine pounds at birth.”
“A baby weighs nine pounds at birth.”

The next example.

“The fattest cat in the world weighs forty pounds.”
“The fattest cat in the world weighs forty pounds.”

The last example.

“His weight is a hundred pounds.”
“His weight is a hundred pounds.”

7:37 [Part 6]

“How much do you weigh?”

Ok, that’s a very serious and private question.

Ok, so, if you don’t want to answer that question, maybe you should say, “no comment”.

Anyway, we learned how to express weight in the Metric System.

“I weigh seventy-five kilograms.”

And the Imperial System.

“I weigh a hundred and sixty-five pounds.”

Ahhh, of course, the Metric System is easier than the Imperial System.

To know and study.

But, you should be familiar with both systems.

Alright, so that’s it and I’ll see you next video.

[END]

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